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Gilbert Inglefield

Citizenship Curriculum 2020-2021

Staff member with overview: Mrs. H. Castledine
Email address: lcastledine@gilbertinglefield.com

Citizenship helps children to develop as members of the school, local, regional, national and global communities. It is concerned with issues of right and wrong, rights and responsibilities, fairness, rules and laws, power and authority, equality and difference, communities and identities, democracy, conflict and cooperation. As children grow and develop, citizenship helps them to think and talk about issues relating to these concepts as they encounter them in their own lives and in the lives of others, and as depicted in the media and in literature. In promoting positive Citizenship skills, we are preparing our pupils for life after school.

Citizenship helps children to develop as members of the school, local, regional, national and global communities. It is concerned with issues of right and wrong, rights and responsibilities, fairness, rules and laws, power and authority, equality and difference, communities and identities, democracy, conflict and cooperation. As children grow and develop, citizenship helps them to think and talk about issues relating to these concepts as they encounter them in their own lives and in the lives of others, and as depicted in the media and in literature.

Developing a whole school approach:

Citizenship has implications for the whole school. This includes what is planned and taught in the classroom - as well as in other subjects – and what is learned through other school and community-based activities.

Activities include:

  • Many whole school policies such as anti-bullying and equal opportunities
  • Voluntary work
  • School Council voting and implementation
  • Relations in the community (including attending the Remembrance service)
  • Visitors to the school:

Year 5 & 6

Citizenship in Key Stage 2 is a non-statutory subject that forms part of the broader framework for personal, social, health, economic education (PSHEE) which aims to ‘give pupils the knowledge, skills and understanding they need to lead confident, independent lives and to become informed, active and responsible citizens.

Year 7 & 8

 A high-quality citizenship education helps to provide pupils with knowledge, skills and understanding to prepare them to play a full and active part in society. In particular, citizenship education should foster pupils’ keen awareness and understanding of democracy, government and how laws are made and upheld. Teaching should equip pupils with the skills and knowledge to explore political and social issues critically, to weigh evidence, debate and make reasoned arguments. It should also prepare pupils to take their place in society as responsible citizens, manage their money well and make sound financial decisions.

 Pupils will be taught about:

  • the development of the political system of democratic government in the United Kingdom, including the roles of citizens, Parliament and the monarch
  • the operation of Parliament, including voting and elections, and the role of political parties
  • the precious liberties enjoyed by the citizens of the United Kingdom
  • the nature of rules and laws and the justice system, including the role of the police and the operation of courts and tribunals
  • the roles played by public institutions and voluntary groups in society, and the ways in which citizens work together to improve their communities, including opportunities to participate in school-based activities
  • the functions and uses of money, the importance and practice of budgeting, and managing risk.

The above guidelines have been chosen from the recommended PSHEE and Citizenship guidelines to support and prepare the children for KS3 Citizenship.

Citizenship sessions will – sometimes – be led by current affairs. 

Programme of Study

 

Year 5

Year 6

Year 7

Year 8

Autumn

 

 

 

 

1

Ready for Middle School

Ready for Year 6 

Ready for Key Stage 3

Ready for Year 8

2

Respect and tolerance

Be Kind

Respect and tolerance

Be Thoughtful

Respect and tolerance

Have Empathy

Respect and tolerance

Be Open-Minded

Pupil Voice

Transition and settling in

School Council Elections (Democracy)

School Council Elections

(Democracy)

Reflections on KS2 – how can we make it better?

School Council Elections

(Democracy)

School Council Elections

(Democracy)

Spring

 

 

 

 

1

The rule of law

Why do schools have rules?

The rule of law

Whose responsibility is our safety?

The rule of law

Safety in our community

The rule of law

Personal safety

2

Year 5 themes

Year 6 themes

Year 7 themes

Year 8 themes

Pupil Voice

 

Reflections on SATs – how have the last 2 years prepared them. EBI…

 

 

Summer

 

 

 

 

1

Individual liberty

What makes me, me?

Individual liberty

Choice and Responsibility

Individual liberty

Freedom, choices, safety, rules

Individual liberty

Fighting for our Freedom

2

Year 5 themes

Year 6 themes

Year 7 themes

Year 8 themes

Pupil Voice

 

 

 

Transition.

Reflections on time at GIA


 

Democracy

Respect and Tolerance

The rule of law

Individual Liberty

Year 5

The role of a school council

Preparing a speech

How voting works – secret ballot

Candidates pitches

Election of school councillors

Be kind – how can we be kind in our relationships with others? What does being kind involve? How does it feel when someone is unkind?

Positive validations – say something kind about others.

Why do schools have rules? What are ours? Why are they important? What rules would you make for your class? Create a class contract.

It OK to be me

Celebrating difference.

 

Year 6

Why is being a school councillor important?

Writing to persuade

Candidates pitches

Election of school councillors

Be thoughtful – why do we need to be thoughtful? What happens when we are thoughtless? How can we encourage people to think of others?

What does it mean to be safe? Whose responsibility is our safety? How do rules and laws help to keep us safe? Who looks out for our safety: police, fire brigade, NHS, teachers etc.

How can we help them keep us safe? How can we ensure we are safe at school?

Choice and Responsibility – actions have consequences. What are acceptable expressions of liberty and what are not (when they take away others freedoms or break the rules).

Year 7

Why are locally elected officials important? Parish, town, county councils

Candidates pitches

Election of school councillors

Have empathy – what does it mean to be empathetic? Why is this important in a community? What happens when we show indifference to others?

Safety in our community. How can we keep safe? What responsibilities do we have to ensure the safety of ourselves and others? What are the consequences of not carrying out these responsibilities?

Freedom, choices, safety, rules

Respect for private lives- media intrusion. What is in the public interest? Should we share everything on social media?

Year 8

How can I make a difference?

Candidates pitches

Election of school councillors

Head Boy/Girl elections

Be open-minded – what does it mean to be tolerant and open-minded? Why should we accept others? Is there ever a situation where it is not good to be open-minded and accepting of others beliefs? How does radicalisation occur? Should we tolerate this?

Personal safety. Gangs and knife crime. Why might someone carry a weapon? What are the consequences for it? Why might someone become involved in a gang? What is the impact on personal safety and the safety of others both physical and mental?

People have fought so that we have individual liberty e.g. 

Mahatma Ghandi

·Harvey Milk

Olaudah Equiano 

Sir Ludwig Guttmann

Malala Yousafzai Emmeline Pankhurst

Martin Luther King